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    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/apps/best-googles-android-apps/The best Google’s own Android appsThe best Google’s own Android apps


As Android has evolved, Google’s worked increasingly hard to keep users locked into its ecosystem. The search giant creates new apps, retains users by giving them a thoroughly decent out-of-the-box experience and then charges device makers for a license to embed them on their phones and tablets. Its constant iteration has helped it stay ahead of the pack for some of its services, but many fall short, leaving users to find something better. The official Gmail app: it’s fine, really it is, but if you want unified inbox support, productivity features or the ability to pull emails from more than one place, you’re left wanting. This sort of limitation can be found across Google’s stable of apps, from messaging to the calendar and camera interface. We’ve trawled Google Play to find software alternatives that — dare we say it — do a better job, at least with certain tasks. So please, whip out your phone and give them a go.

EMAIL

What we’re looking for here is an app that can deliver Google-style levels of reliability, while also being open to non-Google inboxes and offering enhanced features for power users. Luckily for us, there’s no shortage of apps that can do just that.

CloudMagic (Free)



The clue’s in the name, really. Capable of integrating Gmail, Exchange, Yahoo, Outlook, iCloud, Office 365 and IMAP accounts at once, this app uses its cloud algorithms to make your emails easier to find. Unlike Gmail, the clean interface on show here offers a unified inbox that lets you left-swipe emails to perform any one of three actions, a bit like Tinder for the office.

AquaMail (Free/$4.99)



Optimized for both smartphones and tablets, AquaMail offers multi-account support and a simple user interface. Yes, it does look like Gmail, but the team behind AquaMail has constantly refined the interface to make it as easy to use as possible. This includes a dedicated attachments tab at the top of each email, fullscreen modes and a smart inbox. Grabbing the paid version removes the two-account limit and drops the promotional signature attached to all outgoing messages.

We also like: Evomail, Solmail and MailDroid.

 MESSAGING

With the launch of Android 4.4 KitKat, Google ditched its pre-loaded SMS app to let users choose their own. Hangouts became the de-facto starting place, but plenty dislike the app’s inability to properly unify chats and texts under one contact. So here are some solid alternatives.

Textra (Free)



In the migration away from Hangouts, some have resorted to Textra, a messaging app that offers deep customization for notifications and a time-saving quick-reply popup that lets you respond to messages without fully opening the app. Simple in design, Textra handles huge inboxes with no noticeable slowdown, something you’ll appreciate if your friends don’t use Whatsapp.

Hello SMS (Free)



Dropping the inbox for tab-based interface, Hello SMS’ minimalist design puts interactions first with contact names and photos on its left sidebar. If you find yourself in a never-ending group text, the app will intelligently combine messages from up to 15 contacts so you’re not left with a messy inbox. Hello SMS’ one-touch camera interface also lets you send selfies to your friends in double-quick time.

EvolveSMS (Free)



Like Hello SMS, EvolveSMS uses a tabbed interface to showcase your messages. It’s better looking than its rival and displays important information like names, numbers, call options and attachment options inside conversations. While group messaging, message popups, gesture support and notification customization come as standard, additional features are available via in-app purchases. If you decide to upgrade, you’ll get extra theme options, social cover photo integration, scheduled messaging and backup options.

We also like: 8sms and chomp SMS.

CALENDAR

Calendar apps have pushed forward on iOS in the past year, but Android users have seen little change compared to their Apple-loving counterparts. Google’s own is functional and intuitive, but lacks inspiration. If you’re looking for something that goes beyond the traditional grid-based format, check these apps out.

Cal (Free)



Any.do decided to take a different approach with Cal. Sure, it still features gCal support, but it also includes a number of social and productivity features that stand out thanks to its stylish UI. If you have a task listed in Any.do, it’ll pop up in your schedule beneath your planned events. Connect your Facebook account and you’ll be notified of everybody’s birthday, letting you send them a text, email or post on their wall in celebration.

SolCalendar (Free)



With stickers and various themed widgets, SolCalendar is certainly different than most calendar apps on the Play Store. It might not be to everyone’s taste, but it’ll let you add events with a single touch, litter them with birthday cakes and smiley emoticons and display them using any of its 40 home screen widgets. SolCalendar’s neat weather notification also checks the elements, giving you the chance to pack an umbrella before you head out the door.

Agenda ($2)



Coming to Android a little while after iOS, Agenda’s, erm, agenda, is to display all of your calendars in a single and easy-to-read feed of upcoming events. All of the traditional daily, weekly and monthly views are there, letting you create appointments with a single tap. The simple black-and-white interface might not be for some, but it’s certainly helpful if you like to mix work, play and everything else in between.

Keep an eye out for: Sunrise — expected to launch on Android in the coming months.

CAMERA

One of the weakest built-in Android apps is the default camera app. Google admitted it isn’t as good as it should be, prompting it to improve the camera on the Nexus 5 and roll out additional photography settings on newer Android devices. If you’re stuck with an older phone or want to try something new, try these camera app replacements.

ProCapture (Free/$3.99)



Apps like ProCapture go heavy on features and skimp on glitzy UI to make your photos stand out. It offers a high-quality panorama mode, timer, burst, wide shot mode and noise reduction, keeping the focus on shooting modes instead of after-effects. The full version includes support for higher resolutions and touch-to-focus, so we’d recommend the upgrade.

Camera Awesome ($2.99)



SmugMug’s Camera Awesome looks a bit like Apple’s iOS 6 camera app and comes packed with clever features like two-finger focal adjustments. Even better, you can tweak the ISO, white balance and exposure settings all from the screen. Add in a full screen shutter button, burst shot, HDR mode, timer, panorama and social sharing and you’ve got yourself a whole lot of camera app for very little money.

Camera Zoom FX ($2.99)



If filters and after-effects are exactly what you’re looking for, Camera Zoom FX has more than you could possibly need. Without ruining your original images, the app features over 90 built-in filters, frames and effects that range from the sublime to the ridiculous. If you ever wanted to have a virtual photo taken with the Queen, look no further.

We also like: Instagram, VSCO Cam and Pixlr Express

PRODUCTIVITY

While Google’s Keep is a supremely fast and extensive app, self-confessed productivity nuts may feel its simple approach doesn’t deliver enough features. Although Android is overflowing with apps focusing on lists, notes and photos, many don’t hit the right notes. Here are our recommendations.

Evernote (Free)



Evernote is a heavyweight note-taking app, in terms of both features and actual size, supporting lengthy text input. It provides an easy way to add lists and save audio notes, indexing them for later searching. With apps on every major platform (including the web), you can tweak your grocery list anywhere there’s an internet connection.

Any.do (Free)



Any.do, a to-do list app from the makers of Cal, is an amazingly powerful to-do manager that offers cloud sync, time-saving gestures, missed call integration (ever wanted to turn them into reminders?) and auto-suggestion features as standard. Once you become a little more acquainted with the app, you should try its voice support: not only will it transcribe your words into text, but you can also do so in a variety of languages.

We also like: Todoist, Microsoft OneNote, Springpad, Quip and Remember The Milk

WRAP-UP

Before we finish up here, we can’t resist a few more recommendations. Google’s done a great job of porting Chrome from the desktop to mobile, but Dolphin Browser and Mozilla Firefox both offer unique features not found in the search giant’s app. If you wake up one day and find you don’t like the default Clock app, we suggest you check out Timely, even if it is now owned by Google. Also be sure to take a look at QuickPic if you’re after a solid replacement for the Gallery and Photos apps — just don’t ask us why the company decided it needed two apps to handle the same function.

If sampling the best Google Play has to offer isn’t for you, Android’s default apps are constantly being refreshed to deliver additional features. Apps are one of the reasons why the OS has passed one billion activations, after all. Developers focusing only on a handful of apps may be the first to innovate, but it often prompts Google to incorporate features it’s seen elsewhere. While this list won’t stay up-to-date forever, some of these apps have remained popular since Android’s early days and the newer suggestions still have plenty of life in them yet. If you think you have better app recommendations, we’d love to hear them.

Source:Engadget
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/apps/best-googles-android-apps/

    The best Google’s own Android apps

    The best Google’s own Android apps

    android As Android has evolved, Google’s worked increasingly hard to keep users locked into its ecosystem. The search giant creates new apps, retains users by giving them a thoroughly decent out-of-the-box experience and then charges device makers for a license to embed them on their phones and tablets. Its constant iteration has helped it stay ahead of the pack for some of its services, but many fall short, leaving users to find something better. The official Gmail app: it’s fine, really it is, but if you want unified inbox support, productivity features or the ability to pull emails from more than one place, you’re left wanting. This sort of limitation can be found across Google’s stable of apps, from messaging to the calendar and camera interface. We’ve trawled Google Play to find software alternatives that — dare we say it — do a better job, at least with certain tasks. So please, whip out your phone and give them a go. EMAIL What we’re looking for here is an app that can deliver Google-style levels of reliability, while also being open to non-Google inboxes and offering enhanced features for power users. Luckily for us, there’s no shortage of apps that can do just that. CloudMagic (Free) cloudmagic The clue’s in the name, really. Capable of integrating Gmail, Exchange, Yahoo, Outlook, iCloud, Office 365 and IMAP accounts at once, this app uses its cloud algorithms to make your emails easier to find. Unlike Gmail, the clean interface on show here offers a unified inbox that lets you left-swipe emails to perform any one of three actions, a bit like Tinder for the office. AquaMail (Free/$4.99) aquamail Optimized for both smartphones and tablets, AquaMail offers multi-account support and a simple user interface. Yes, it does look like Gmail, but the team behind AquaMail has constantly refined the interface to make it as easy to use as possible. This includes a dedicated attachments tab at the top of each email, fullscreen modes and a smart inbox. Grabbing the paid version removes the two-account limit and drops the promotional signature attached to all outgoing messages. We also like: Evomail, Solmail and MailDroid.  MESSAGING With the launch of Android 4.4 KitKat, Google ditched its pre-loaded SMS app to let users choose their own. Hangouts became the de-facto starting place, but plenty dislike the app’s inability to properly unify chats and texts under one contact. So here are some solid alternatives. Textra (Free) textra In the migration away from Hangouts, some have resorted to Textra, a messaging app that offers deep customization for notifications and a time-saving quick-reply popup that lets you respond to messages without fully opening the app. Simple in design, Textra handles huge inboxes with no noticeable slowdown, something you’ll appreciate if your friends don’t use Whatsapp. Hello SMS (Free) hellosms Dropping the inbox for tab-based interface, Hello SMS’ minimalist design puts interactions first with contact names and photos on its left sidebar. If you find yourself in a never-ending group text, the app will intelligently combine messages from up to 15 contacts so you’re not left with a messy inbox. Hello SMS’ one-touch camera interface also lets you send selfies to your friends in double-quick time. EvolveSMS (Free) evolvesms Like Hello SMS, EvolveSMS uses a tabbed interface to showcase your messages. It’s better looking than its rival and displays important information like names, numbers, call options and attachment options inside conversations. While group messaging, message popups, gesture support and notification customization come as standard, additional features are available via in-app purchases. If you decide to upgrade, you’ll get extra theme options, social cover photo integration, scheduled messaging and backup options. We also like: 8sms and chomp SMS. CALENDAR Calendar apps have pushed forward on iOS in the past year, but Android users have seen little change compared to their Apple-loving counterparts. Google’s own is functional and intuitive, but lacks inspiration. If you’re looking for something that goes beyond the traditional grid-based format, check these apps out. Cal (Free) cal Any.do decided to take a different approach with Cal. Sure, it still features gCal support, but it also includes a number of social and productivity features that stand out thanks to its stylish UI. If you have a task listed in Any.do, it’ll pop up in your schedule beneath your planned events. Connect your Facebook account and you’ll be notified of everybody’s birthday, letting you send them a text, email or post on their wall in celebration. SolCalendar (Free) solcalendar With stickers and various themed widgets, SolCalendar is certainly different than most calendar apps on the Play Store. It might not be to everyone’s taste, but it’ll let you add events with a single touch, litter them with birthday cakes and smiley emoticons and display them using any of its 40 home screen widgets. SolCalendar’s neat weather notification also checks the elements, giving you the chance to pack an umbrella before you head out the door. Agenda ($2) agenda Coming to Android a little while after iOS, Agenda’s, erm, agenda, is to display all of your calendars in a single and easy-to-read feed of upcoming events. All of the traditional daily, weekly and monthly views are there, letting you create appointments with a single tap. The simple black-and-white interface might not be for some, but it’s certainly helpful if you like to mix work, play and everything else in between. Keep an eye out for: Sunrise — expected to launch on Android in the coming months. CAMERA One of the weakest built-in Android apps is the default camera app. Google admitted it isn’t as good as it should be, prompting it to improve the camera on the Nexus 5 and roll out additional photography settings on newer Android devices. If you’re stuck with an older phone or want to try something new, try these camera app replacements. ProCapture (Free/$3.99) procapture Apps like ProCapture go heavy on features and skimp on glitzy UI to make your photos stand out. It offers a high-quality panorama mode, timer, burst, wide shot mode and noise reduction, keeping the focus on shooting modes instead of after-effects. The full version includes support for higher resolutions and touch-to-focus, so we’d recommend the upgrade. Camera Awesome ($2.99) camerawesome SmugMug’s Camera Awesome looks a bit like Apple’s iOS 6 camera app and comes packed with clever features like two-finger focal adjustments. Even better, you can tweak the ISO, white balance and exposure settings all from the screen. Add in a full screen shutter button, burst shot, HDR mode, timer, panorama and social sharing and you’ve got yourself a whole lot of camera app for very little money. Camera Zoom FX ($2.99) camerafx If filters and after-effects are exactly what you’re looking for, Camera Zoom FX has more than you could possibly need. Without ruining your original images, the app features over 90 built-in filters, frames and effects that range from the sublime to the ridiculous. If you ever wanted to have a virtual photo taken with the Queen, look no further. We also like: Instagram, VSCO Cam and Pixlr Express PRODUCTIVITY While Google’s Keep is a supremely fast and extensive app, self-confessed productivity nuts may feel its simple approach doesn’t deliver enough features. Although Android is overflowing with apps focusing on lists, notes and photos, many don’t hit the right notes. Here are our recommendations. Evernote (Free) evernote Evernote is a heavyweight note-taking app, in terms of both features and actual size, supporting lengthy text input. It provides an easy way to add lists and save audio notes, indexing them for later searching. With apps on every major platform (including the web), you can tweak your grocery list anywhere there’s an internet connection. Any.do (Free) anydo Any.do, a to-do list app from the makers of Cal, is an amazingly powerful to-do manager that offers cloud sync, time-saving gestures, missed call integration (ever wanted to turn them into reminders?) and auto-suggestion features as standard. Once you become a little more acquainted with the app, you should try its voice support: not only will it transcribe your words into text, but you can also do so in a variety of languages. We also like: Todoist, Microsoft OneNote, Springpad, Quip and Remember The Milk WRAP-UP Before we finish up here, we can’t resist a few more recommendations. Google’s done a great job of porting Chrome from the desktop to mobile, but Dolphin Browser and Mozilla Firefox both offer unique features not found in the search giant’s app. If you wake up one day and find you don’t like the default Clock app, we suggest you check out Timely, even if it is now owned by Google. Also be sure to take a look at QuickPic if you’re after a solid replacement for the Gallery and Photos apps — just don’t ask us why the company decided it needed two apps to handle the same function. If sampling the best Google Play has to offer isn’t for you, Android’s default apps are constantly being refreshed to deliver additional features. Apps are one of the reasons why the OS has passed one billion activations, after all. Developers focusing only on a handful of apps may be the first to innovate, but it often prompts Google to incorporate features it’s seen elsewhere. While this list won’t stay up-to-date forever, some of these apps have remained popular since Android’s early days and the newer suggestions still have plenty of life in them yet. If you think you have better app recommendations, we’d love to hear them. Source:Engadget
    — 2 months ago
    #AquaMail  #CloudMagic  #Download Google Apps  #google apps  #List of google apps  #Textra 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/gadgets/first-xbox-goes-live-one-update/first xbox goes live with one updatefirst xbox goes live with one update
 
Microsoft’s spring update for the Xbox One is here! (Cue triumphant trumpets.) It’s a few days later than anticipated but, as they say, better late than never. The first major update for the console packs a host of improvements, including better Kinect voice recognition, improved all-round stability, and some key fixes to the dashboard — such as onscreen meters for the controller’s battery and free HDD space. You’ll also be able to plug a USB keyboard in, which should make web browsing and searching a whole lot less painful. The update is rolling out to customers during “off-peak” hours in their local time zones. Or as the ever eloquent Larry Hryb put it, “never fear you’ll see it sometime over the weekend.” If you’re taking advantage of Xbox’s Instant On feature, the console will check for an update next time you turn it off.
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/gadgets/first-xbox-goes-live-one-update/

    first xbox goes live with one update

    first xbox goes live with one update

     xbox one dash lead
    Microsoft’s spring update for the Xbox One is here! (Cue triumphant trumpets.) It’s a few days later than anticipated but, as they say, better late than never. The first major update for the console packs a host of improvements, including better Kinect voice recognition, improved all-round stability, and some key fixes to the dashboard — such as onscreen meters for the controller’s battery and free HDD space. You’ll also be able to plug a USB keyboard in, which should make web browsing and searching a whole lot less painful. The update is rolling out to customers during “off-peak” hours in their local time zones. Or as the ever eloquent Larry Hryb put it, “never fear you’ll see it sometime over the weekend.” If you’re taking advantage of Xbox’s Instant On feature, the console will check for an update next time you turn it off.
    — 2 months ago
    #2014 xbox news  #latest technology news  #Microsoft Latest News  #Xbox Latest news 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/science/nuclear-fusion-energy-one-step-closer-us/Nuclear Fusion Energy One step closer to usNuclear Fusion Energy One step closer to us


Scientists with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Liver more National Laboratory announced today that they have achieved a critical step in fusion research: For the first time, their hydrogen fuel has given off more energy than it took in.

Though an important milestone, the result does not mean that your Delorean is soon going to sport a Mr. Fusion reactor. NIF would need to sustain temperatures and pressures much greater than they are currently capable of before they can harness fusion energy.

Nuclear fusion is the energy source of the stars. Deep in our sun’s belly, hydrogen atoms slam into one another at high speed, getting mashed together to form helium atoms and releasing copious amounts of energy. Creating viable fusion energy here on Earth has been a dream since the dawn of the Atomic Age. With true fusion power, the amount of water you use in a single shower could provide all your energy needs for a year. But for six decades, fusion has remained a far-off dream.

To create fusion reactions at NIF, scientists shoot 192 lasers simultaneously with a peak power of 500 trillion Watts, roughly the energy the U.S. consumes every six minutes. This heats up a 1 centimeter gold cylinder to millions of degrees, producing X-rays that get focused at a plastic shell the size of a BB pellet. The X-rays blast the shell, creating an implosion that shrinks the gas inside pellet to 1/35th of its size, compressing isotopes of hydrogen known as deuterium and tritium to incredible densities. At the center of this hydrogen plasma, in an area smaller than the width of a human hair, the atoms fuse. This gives off energy, which should in theory set off a chain reaction that ignites the rest of the hydrogen and creates a self-sustaining ball of fusion.

Because of this convoluted process, only 1/200th of the energy that the lasers generate is imparted to the hydrogen fuel, compressing it enough to produce a small amount of fusion. Until now, the energy given off by the fusing hydrogen hasn’t been enough to set off a chain reaction. The hydrogen fuel also always consumed more energy than it put out. But during experiments late last year, NIF researchers were finally able to get the hydrogen to give off as much as 1.7 times more energy than it had taken in, a result that appears today in Nature. In subsequent experiments last month, the team was able to produce as much as 2.6 times more energy than was put into the hydrogen fuel.

“The physics is a breakthrough,” said physicist Riccardo Betti of the University of Rochester, who was not involved in the work. “If fusion will ever become a viable source of energy, we may look back and say that in 2013, for the first time, a plasma produced more energy out than it took in.”

But the dream of fusion energy isn’t yet a reality. “In terms of making energy to power the grid, it’s still light-years away,” Betti said.

 

NIF is a $3.5-billion facility that was built to study the dynamics of nuclear explosions for the National Nuclear Security Administration and to test the integrity of the country’s nuclear stockpile without exploding any bombs. After the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty, the U.S., Russia, and many other countries agreed to only test atomic bombs underground, and since 1992 the U.S. has placed a moratorium on any nuclear testing. But not being able to physically test the bombs “is like having a car that you’re studying but not allowed to start,” said Livermore Lab physicist Paul Springer, a co-author of the recent fusion results. NIF was the answer to this problem.

When NIF was first being built, researchers were confident that it would produce fusion reactions fairly quickly. The point when fusion becomes self-sustaining is known as ignition. The fusing hydrogen atoms at the fuel center send out helium nuclei, which knock into other hydrogen atoms, setting off a cascading chain-reaction of expansion fusion that should produce more energy than the entire experiment consumes. While ignition requires extremely high temperatures and pressures, computer simulations in 2009 predicted that NIF would achieve the energies to generate it by 2012. Of course, reality doesn’t work as well as a digital model, and the deadline passed without achieving ignition.

Troubles came when scientists found it was extremely difficult to get their hydrogen fuel to compress in the right way. In order to generate the intense pressure and temperatures inside the hydrogen gas needed for fusion, the tiny pellet had to collapse perfectly symmetrically. But small instabilities appearing in the pellet meant that the plasma imploded unevenly, sending fingers of cold gas into the center that doused the fusion reactions.

Over the years, NIF scientists learned from their experiments. They studied the way that the pellet collapsed, and tweaked their designs. They also learned how to time their laser pulses to give the hydrogen the perfect kick. With this knowledge, researchers have been able to go back and improve their simulations, which are now in better agreement with what is physically seen in experiments.

But the latest achievements are still a long way from creating self-sustaining fusion reactions, which would require the hydrogen to reach temperatures of hundreds of millions of degrees and pressures a thousand times more than what is currently possible. The implosion continues to be more of an amorphous blob than a perfect spherical cave-in. To go forward, researchers will have to “make the collapse rounder and more stable against things that cause distortions,” said Springer.

Still, a future with fusion power is starting to look more possible. A European team is also attempting to generate fusion energy at the $20 billion International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) currently under construction in France. That facility will trap superheated hydrogen plasma in a donut-shaped magnetic chamber, an entirely different technique than what has been achieved at NIF, meaning that the lessons from the Livermore Lab won’t be entirely applicable. Rather than set unrealistic deadlines, ITER is moving forward at a very slow and steady pace.

In the meantime, the NIF team is happy with their achievements and cautiously optimistic of their future prospects. “We’ve all been extremely excited about the results that we’ve been getting,” said physicist Denise Hinkel of Livermore Lab, another co-author. “Many people have been waiting for something like this to happen.”
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/science/nuclear-fusion-energy-one-step-closer-us/

    Nuclear Fusion Energy One step closer to us

    Nuclear Fusion Energy One step closer to us

    Hohlraum cut away with capsule Scientists with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Liver more National Laboratory announced today that they have achieved a critical step in fusion research: For the first time, their hydrogen fuel has given off more energy than it took in. Though an important milestone, the result does not mean that your Delorean is soon going to sport a Mr. Fusion reactor. NIF would need to sustain temperatures and pressures much greater than they are currently capable of before they can harness fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the energy source of the stars. Deep in our sun’s belly, hydrogen atoms slam into one another at high speed, getting mashed together to form helium atoms and releasing copious amounts of energy. Creating viable fusion energy here on Earth has been a dream since the dawn of the Atomic Age. With true fusion power, the amount of water you use in a single shower could provide all your energy needs for a year. But for six decades, fusion has remained a far-off dream. To create fusion reactions at NIF, scientists shoot 192 lasers simultaneously with a peak power of 500 trillion Watts, roughly the energy the U.S. consumes every six minutes. This heats up a 1 centimeter gold cylinder to millions of degrees, producing X-rays that get focused at a plastic shell the size of a BB pellet. The X-rays blast the shell, creating an implosion that shrinks the gas inside pellet to 1/35th of its size, compressing isotopes of hydrogen known as deuterium and tritium to incredible densities. At the center of this hydrogen plasma, in an area smaller than the width of a human hair, the atoms fuse. This gives off energy, which should in theory set off a chain reaction that ignites the rest of the hydrogen and creates a self-sustaining ball of fusion. Preamplifier at the National Ignition FacilityBecause of this convoluted process, only 1/200th of the energy that the lasers generate is imparted to the hydrogen fuel, compressing it enough to produce a small amount of fusion. Until now, the energy given off by the fusing hydrogen hasn’t been enough to set off a chain reaction. The hydrogen fuel also always consumed more energy than it put out. But during experiments late last year, NIF researchers were finally able to get the hydrogen to give off as much as 1.7 times more energy than it had taken in, a result that appears today in Nature. In subsequent experiments last month, the team was able to produce as much as 2.6 times more energy than was put into the hydrogen fuel. “The physics is a breakthrough,” said physicist Riccardo Betti of the University of Rochester, who was not involved in the work. “If fusion will ever become a viable source of energy, we may look back and say that in 2013, for the first time, a plasma produced more energy out than it took in.” But the dream of fusion energy isn’t yet a reality. “In terms of making energy to power the grid, it’s still light-years away,” Betti said.   NIF is a $3.5-billion facility that was built to study the dynamics of nuclear explosions for the National Nuclear Security Administration and to test the integrity of the country’s nuclear stockpile without exploding any bombs. After the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty, the U.S., Russia, and many other countries agreed to only test atomic bombs underground, and since 1992 the U.S. has placed a moratorium on any nuclear testing. But not being able to physically test the bombs “is like having a car that you’re studying but not allowed to start,” said Livermore Lab physicist Paul Springer, a co-author of the recent fusion results. NIF was the answer to this problem. When NIF was first being built, researchers were confident that it would produce fusion reactions fairly quickly. The point when fusion becomes self-sustaining is known as ignition. The fusing hydrogen atoms at the fuel center send out helium nuclei, which knock into other hydrogen atoms, setting off a cascading chain-reaction of expansion fusion that should produce more energy than the entire experiment consumes. While ignition requires extremely high temperatures and pressures, computer simulations in 2009 predicted that NIF would achieve the energies to generate it by 2012. Of course, reality doesn’t work as well as a digital model, and the deadline passed without achieving ignition. Laser view of target at the National Ignition FacilityTroubles came when scientists found it was extremely difficult to get their hydrogen fuel to compress in the right way. In order to generate the intense pressure and temperatures inside the hydrogen gas needed for fusion, the tiny pellet had to collapse perfectly symmetrically. But small instabilities appearing in the pellet meant that the plasma imploded unevenly, sending fingers of cold gas into the center that doused the fusion reactions. Over the years, NIF scientists learned from their experiments. They studied the way that the pellet collapsed, and tweaked their designs. They also learned how to time their laser pulses to give the hydrogen the perfect kick. With this knowledge, researchers have been able to go back and improve their simulations, which are now in better agreement with what is physically seen in experiments. But the latest achievements are still a long way from creating self-sustaining fusion reactions, which would require the hydrogen to reach temperatures of hundreds of millions of degrees and pressures a thousand times more than what is currently possible. The implosion continues to be more of an amorphous blob than a perfect spherical cave-in. To go forward, researchers will have to “make the collapse rounder and more stable against things that cause distortions,” said Springer. Still, a future with fusion power is starting to look more possible. A European team is also attempting to generate fusion energy at the $20 billion International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) currently under construction in France. That facility will trap superheated hydrogen plasma in a donut-shaped magnetic chamber, an entirely different technique than what has been achieved at NIF, meaning that the lessons from the Livermore Lab won’t be entirely applicable. Rather than set unrealistic deadlines, ITER is moving forward at a very slow and steady pace. In the meantime, the NIF team is happy with their achievements and cautiously optimistic of their future prospects. “We’ve all been extremely excited about the results that we’ve been getting,” said physicist Denise Hinkel of Livermore Lab, another co-author. “Many people have been waiting for something like this to happen.”
    — 2 months ago
    #2014 science news  #Latest News on Nuclear fusion energy  #Latest news on science  #Nuclear Fusion Energy  #Nuclear Fusion Energy 2014  #Nuclear Fusion Energy News 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/google/googles-new-wearable-contact-lens/Google’s new wearable contact lensGoogle’s new wearable project is a smart contact lens with medical uses



Google loves wearable and this time it’s getting even closer to your body with a developmental smart contact lens. Through miniaturized electronics, it can apparently measure the levels of glucose in your tears, offering diabetics an easier way to monitor their condition without the needles and the blood — something we’ve reported on before. A tiny (really tiny) wireless chip and glucose sensor are wedged between two layers of “biocompatible” contact lens material, and Google is saying that it’s already working on embedding tiny LED lights for notifications, too. There’s been no shortage of developmental contact lens tech over the last few years, but the clout of Google means this could well be the most realistic mainstream offering, in addition to its very practical use cases. Google is currently angling for partners with more expertise in the medical market to help make it happen and is “in discussions with the FDA” to ensure the tech ticks all the right healthcare boxes before it progresses further.

Recode’s got a deep dive on the make-up of the smart contact: we’ve added their science textbook-grade diagram right after the break.



 

 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/google/googles-new-wearable-contact-lens/

    Google’s new wearable contact lens

    Google’s new wearable project is a smart contact lens with medical uses

    contactlens Google loves wearable and this time it’s getting even closer to your body with a developmental smart contact lens. Through miniaturized electronics, it can apparently measure the levels of glucose in your tears, offering diabetics an easier way to monitor their condition without the needles and the blood — something we’ve reported on before. A tiny (really tiny) wireless chip and glucose sensor are wedged between two layers of “biocompatible” contact lens material, and Google is saying that it’s already working on embedding tiny LED lights for notifications, too. There’s been no shortage of developmental contact lens tech over the last few years, but the clout of Google means this could well be the most realistic mainstream offering, in addition to its very practical use cases. Google is currently angling for partners with more expertise in the medical market to help make it happen and is “in discussions with the FDA” to ensure the tech ticks all the right healthcare boxes before it progresses further. Recode’s got a deep dive on the make-up of the smart contact: we’ve added their science textbook-grade diagram right after the break. lens    
    — 3 months ago
    #Google lens  #Google wearable lens  #Latest lens  #Latest news from google 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/gaming/watch-dogs-game-playstation-3-playstation-4/Watch Dogs Game for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4Watch Dogs (PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, PC)



 
Ah, the long-promised Watch Dogs. The game, originally slated as a launch title for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One but delayed to 2014, is set in an open-world, alternate reality version of Chicago where an all-seeing operating system called ctOS runs in all the electronic devices around you. But great news: You can hack ctOS too, and much of the fun of the game seems to lie in the creative ways it lets you disrupt the world around you, like changing traffic lights and messing with cellphones. Not only does it transform hacking from a throwaway minigame into a core premise, it offers a novel (but optional) multiplayer element in which you can drop into another player’s single-player game, hack him, and take what you gain back to your own game. Filled with the sort of near-future paranoia that’s looking less near-future all the time, Watch Dogs may have made us wait, but it still looks like it’s worth it. –Laura Hudson
Release date: Q2 2014

 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/gaming/watch-dogs-game-playstation-3-playstation-4/

    Watch Dogs Game for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4

    Watch Dogs (PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, PC)

    WATCH-DOGS-660x343  

    Ah, the long-promised Watch Dogs. The game, originally slated as a launch title for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One but delayed to 2014, is set in an open-world, alternate reality version of Chicago where an all-seeing operating system called ctOS runs in all the electronic devices around you. But great news: You can hack ctOS too, and much of the fun of the game seems to lie in the creative ways it lets you disrupt the world around you, like changing traffic lights and messing with cellphones. Not only does it transform hacking from a throwaway minigame into a core premise, it offers a novel (but optional) multiplayer element in which you can drop into another player’s single-player game, hack him, and take what you gain back to your own game. Filled with the sort of near-future paranoia that’s looking less near-future all the time, Watch Dogs may have made us wait, but it still looks like it’s worth it. –Laura Hudson

    Release date: Q2 2014  
    — 3 months ago
    #Game of Watch Dogs  #PC game  #PlayStation 3 Games  #PlayStation 4  #Xbox 360 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/software/sony-talks-microsoft-adopting-windows-phone/Sony in talks with Microsoft about adopting Windows Phone  Sony in talks with Microsoft about adopting Windows Phone
Sony may be looking at widening its horizons beyond the Android operating system, if reports are to be believed. The company has been hinting at it for a while now and Sony Mobile’s Europe head has said that the company is actively looking into the possibility of launching a Windows Phone device soon.
Pierre Perron has told TechRadar that Sony wishes to move beyond being a single OS manufacturer and is looking at multiple partners, including Microsoft, to broaden the Sony spectrum. He said that working with Microsoft on the PC platform had been an interesting proposition for the company and hopes to see the partnership expand to Windows Phone too.

“We are continuing our discussions with other partners, including Microsoft, as part of our partnership with this company on the broader Sony spectrum…One thing is using the platform [Windows Phone] itself, and another is ‘what can we deliver on top of it’?” Perron said.

Back in 2012 too, there had been word going around that Sony was eying a piece of the Windows Phone pie and it was Perron himself who had hinted at this a couple of years ago too. However, Sony CEO Kunimasa Suzuki had moved in swiftly to quash rumours around the company’s alleged Windows Phone ambitions, saying that Sony was not to release a Windows Phone anytime soon.

Sony has had a brief romance with Windows Phone with the Xperia X1 release back in 2008 but that was the end of that story. An X2 sequel was to hit markets soon after but it never ended up coming to the markets. Meanwhile, Sony went on to have a stellar partnership with Google, turning into one of the foremost Android handset manufacturers in the world. Sony recently showed off the Xperia Z1 Compact, a mini version of the company’s flagship Xperia Z1, at the CES 2014 and has been receiving interesting reviews for the phone.

While Sony is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to Android, a partnership with Microsoft could well be a turning point for the company. While Perron refused to give a specific time frame as to when we could see a partnership between Sony and Microsoft materalise, he said, “We don’t want to be a single OS manufacturer, I don’t think it’s a viable position in the long term.”
Source:Tech2
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/software/sony-talks-microsoft-adopting-windows-phone/

    Sony in talks with Microsoft about adopting Windows Phone

    Sony in talks with Microsoft about adopting Windows Phone Sony in talks with Microsoft about adopting Windows Phone

    Sony may be looking at widening its horizons beyond the Android operating system, if reports are to be believed. The company has been hinting at it for a while now and Sony Mobile’s Europe head has said that the company is actively looking into the possibility of launching a Windows Phone device soon.

    Pierre Perron has told TechRadar that Sony wishes to move beyond being a single OS manufacturer and is looking at multiple partners, including Microsoft, to broaden the Sony spectrum. He said that working with Microsoft on the PC platform had been an interesting proposition for the company and hopes to see the partnership expand to Windows Phone too. “We are continuing our discussions with other partners, including Microsoft, as part of our partnership with this company on the broader Sony spectrum…One thing is using the platform [Windows Phone] itself, and another is ‘what can we deliver on top of it’?” Perron said. Back in 2012 too, there had been word going around that Sony was eying a piece of the Windows Phone pie and it was Perron himself who had hinted at this a couple of years ago too. However, Sony CEO Kunimasa Suzuki had moved in swiftly to quash rumours around the company’s alleged Windows Phone ambitions, saying that Sony was not to release a Windows Phone anytime soon. Sony has had a brief romance with Windows Phone with the Xperia X1 release back in 2008 but that was the end of that story. An X2 sequel was to hit markets soon after but it never ended up coming to the markets. Meanwhile, Sony went on to have a stellar partnership with Google, turning into one of the foremost Android handset manufacturers in the world. Sony recently showed off the Xperia Z1 Compact, a mini version of the company’s flagship Xperia Z1, at the CES 2014 and has been receiving interesting reviews for the phone. While Sony is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to Android, a partnership with Microsoft could well be a turning point for the company. While Perron refused to give a specific time frame as to when we could see a partnership between Sony and Microsoft materalise, he said, “We don’t want to be a single OS manufacturer, I don’t think it’s a viable position in the long term.”

    Source:Tech2

    — 3 months ago
    #Android  #Microsoft  #WINDOWS PHONE 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/mobile-phones/nokia-lumia-1520-screen-sensitivity-issue-fixed/Nokia Lumia 1520 Screen Sensitivity issue fixed  Nokia Lumia 1520 Screen Sensitivity issue fixed
After rolling out the Lumia Black update, Nokia has also bumped the ‘Extras+Info’ to a newer version. The update has brought along some good news for Lumia 1520 users as it fixes the screen sensitivity complaint that had been affecting the phone’s performance.
The update bumps Extras+Info to version 3.4.3.5 and according to the Windows Phone Store listing and brings along several bug fixes on a general level. WP Central, though, has reported that this update has fixed a screen sensitivity complaint that Nokia Lumia 1520 users had been reporting for a while now.

With the issue, the display was extra sensitive to touch and would often register even scrolls as touches. So, if you’re going through a bunch of messages, you would end up opening one by mistake rather than scrolling past it, due to the screen being too sensitive. The publication reports that even on apps like 6tag, scrolling through images would activate the ‘double-tap to like’ feature of the phone. Reports are now suggesting that this Extras+Info update has ended up making the Lumia 1520’s sensitivity problem disappear.

Nokia has started rolling out the Lumia Black update starting yesterday and has started off with the Lumia 1020 and Lumia 925 models already. Other models are to be queued up for an update over the next few weeks. Besides some tweaks, major new features like the ability to create folders and pin them on the Start screen have also been added to Lumia Black phones.

Nokia Glance screen 2.0, where you can look at notifications in real time has been added too. Nokia’s Refocus app which lets you click first and focus on the image later is coming to all Windows Phone 8 Lumia phones that have 1GB of RAM at least and the same goes with Nokia Beamer.
Source:Tech2
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/mobile-phones/nokia-lumia-1520-screen-sensitivity-issue-fixed/

    Nokia Lumia 1520 Screen Sensitivity issue fixed

    Nokia Lumia 1520 Screen Sensitivity issue fixed Nokia Lumia 1520 Screen Sensitivity issue fixed

    After rolling out the Lumia Black update, Nokia has also bumped the ‘Extras+Info’ to a newer version. The update has brought along some good news for Lumia 1520 users as it fixes the screen sensitivity complaint that had been affecting the phone’s performance.

    The update bumps Extras+Info to version 3.4.3.5 and according to the Windows Phone Store listing and brings along several bug fixes on a general level. WP Central, though, has reported that this update has fixed a screen sensitivity complaint that Nokia Lumia 1520 users had been reporting for a while now. With the issue, the display was extra sensitive to touch and would often register even scrolls as touches. So, if you’re going through a bunch of messages, you would end up opening one by mistake rather than scrolling past it, due to the screen being too sensitive. The publication reports that even on apps like 6tag, scrolling through images would activate the ‘double-tap to like’ feature of the phone. Reports are now suggesting that this Extras+Info update has ended up making the Lumia 1520’s sensitivity problem disappear. Nokia has started rolling out the Lumia Black update starting yesterday and has started off with the Lumia 1020 and Lumia 925 models already. Other models are to be queued up for an update over the next few weeks. Besides some tweaks, major new features like the ability to create folders and pin them on the Start screen have also been added to Lumia Black phones. Nokia Glance screen 2.0, where you can look at notifications in real time has been added too. Nokia’s Refocus app which lets you click first and focus on the image later is coming to all Windows Phone 8 Lumia phones that have 1GB of RAM at least and the same goes with Nokia Beamer.

    Source:Tech2

    — 3 months ago
    #Lumia Black  #Nokia Extras+Info  #NOKIA LUMIA 1520 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/laptops-pcs/lenovo-launches-worlds-thinnest-14-inch-ultrabook/Lenovo launches world’s thinnest 14-inch ultrabook  Lenovo launches world’s thinnest 14-inch ultrabook ThinkPad X1 Carbon
Lenovo showed off the new and updated version of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon at the ongoing CES festival in Las Vegas. Lenovo is touting the new ThinkPad X1 Carbon as the world’s lightest 14 inch ultra book.
“Lenovo continues to push the boundaries of design and technology as we aspire to create the best products in the market. The ThinkPad X1 Carbon delivers a stunning user experience with the best professional display and new interactive methods and represents another step in our PC plus journey”, said Peter Hortensius, SVP and president, Think Business Group, Lenovo in a press release.
The new X1 Carbon weighing only 2.8 pounds (around 1.2 kgs). Despite the light weight, Lenovo claims the ultra book is made from toughest materials and has excellent durability. The company claims that the X1 is made from same material as aircrafts and racing cars – namely Carbon Fiber – which while weighing less than magnesium and aluminum, is stronger than both.
The new X1 Carbon has an Adaptive Keyboard, which dynamically adjusts based on the software or application being used to highlight the most relevant keys. The new ultrabook also integrates voice and gesture control.
As far as battery goes, Lenovo says it comes with 9 hour batter life and users can get 80 percent charge in under an hour. It also has optional built-in 4G capability. It has the option of going for an Intel Core i7 with up to Intel HD Graphics 5000 powers. It runs Windows 8.1. The display resolution is 2560 x 1440 pixels. The Ultrabook has 8GB RAM and 512 GB of SSD.
The ThinkPad X1 Carbon start at $1299 and will be available from late January. No word on any India launch date or pricing. It also supports Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi and 2 USB 3.0 ports and support for a full-size HDMI cable.
Source:Tech2
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/laptops-pcs/lenovo-launches-worlds-thinnest-14-inch-ultrabook/

    Lenovo launches world’s thinnest 14-inch ultrabook

    Lenovo launches world’s thinnest 14-inch ultrabook ThinkPad X1 Carbon Lenovo launches world’s thinnest 14-inch ultrabook ThinkPad X1 Carbon

    Lenovo showed off the new and updated version of the ThinkPad X1 Carbon at the ongoing CES festival in Las Vegas. Lenovo is touting the new ThinkPad X1 Carbon as the world’s lightest 14 inch ultra book.

    “Lenovo continues to push the boundaries of design and technology as we aspire to create the best products in the market. The ThinkPad X1 Carbon delivers a stunning user experience with the best professional display and new interactive methods and represents another step in our PC plus journey”, said Peter Hortensius, SVP and president, Think Business Group, Lenovo in a press release.

    The new X1 Carbon weighing only 2.8 pounds (around 1.2 kgs). Despite the light weight, Lenovo claims the ultra book is made from toughest materials and has excellent durability. The company claims that the X1 is made from same material as aircrafts and racing cars – namely Carbon Fiber – which while weighing less than magnesium and aluminum, is stronger than both.

    The new X1 Carbon has an Adaptive Keyboard, which dynamically adjusts based on the software or application being used to highlight the most relevant keys. The new ultrabook also integrates voice and gesture control.

    As far as battery goes, Lenovo says it comes with 9 hour batter life and users can get 80 percent charge in under an hour. It also has optional built-in 4G capability. It has the option of going for an Intel Core i7 with up to Intel HD Graphics 5000 powers. It runs Windows 8.1. The display resolution is 2560 x 1440 pixels. The Ultrabook has 8GB RAM and 512 GB of SSD.

    The ThinkPad X1 Carbon start at $1299 and will be available from late January. No word on any India launch date or pricing. It also supports Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi and 2 USB 3.0 ports and support for a full-size HDMI cable.

    Source:Tech2

    — 3 months ago
    #CES 2014  #Gadgets  #laptops  #LENOVO  #Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon  #Personal Technology  #technology  #ThinkPad X1 Carbon launch date  #ThinkPad X1 Carbon price  #ULTRABOOKS 
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/mobile-phones/iberry-jumps-octa-core/iBerry jumps on the octa-core  iBerry jumps on the octa-core bandwagon with the Auxus Nuclea N2
The Auxus Nuclea N2 smartphone has launched in India by technology manufacturer, iBerry. The phone is an Octa-Core one and is priced at an introductory offer of Rs 19,990.
The smartphone is powered by a MediaTek True Octa-Core MT6592 chipset that clocks in at 1.7GHz. The Auxus Nuclea 2 also features a 2GB RAM and comes with a 5.7-inch Full HD Active Matrix Display and OGS technology.

The Nuclea 2 will come along with 16GB of inbuilt storage that can further be expanded to 64GB using a microSD card. The smartphone also supports dual-SIM (GSM+GSM) function but requires one micro-SIM card and one of a regular size.

The phone currently runs Android version 4.2.2 Jelly Bean but iBerry claims that it will be updating the device to run Android version 4.4 KitKat by the end of the first quarter, this year. The upgrade, says iBerry, will arrive via an Over-the-Air (OTA) update.

As far as the imaging bit for the iBerry Auxus Nuclea N2 goes, the smartphone will sport a 13-megapixel rear snapper. It will come along with a BSI sensor and auto-focus capabilities. The company has not revealed details about the front camera on the Nuclea N2 though. The connectivity part of the phone sees NFC, along with the usual suspects like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, EDGE, GPRS, GPS/AGPS and 3G. The whole show is powered by a 3,500mAh Li-on battery that promises a talk time of more than 12 hours.

The phone will be priced at Rs 19,990 for only a limited period of 10 days, starting January 18, 2013. The offer can be redeemed from iBerry’s official website and authorised retailers across the country. The regular price of Rs 23,990 will come into effect post the 10 day period. The N2 will compete directly with the Gionee Elife E7 Mini and Intex Aqua Octa, both of which retail around the same price point.
Source:Tech2
    http://www.beatechnocrat.com/mobile-phones/iberry-jumps-octa-core/

    iBerry jumps on the octa-core

    iBerry jumps on the octa-core bandwagon with the Auxus Nuclea N2 iBerry jumps on the octa-core bandwagon with the Auxus Nuclea N2

    The Auxus Nuclea N2 smartphone has launched in India by technology manufacturer, iBerry. The phone is an Octa-Core one and is priced at an introductory offer of Rs 19,990.

    The smartphone is powered by a MediaTek True Octa-Core MT6592 chipset that clocks in at 1.7GHz. The Auxus Nuclea 2 also features a 2GB RAM and comes with a 5.7-inch Full HD Active Matrix Display and OGS technology. The Nuclea 2 will come along with 16GB of inbuilt storage that can further be expanded to 64GB using a microSD card. The smartphone also supports dual-SIM (GSM+GSM) function but requires one micro-SIM card and one of a regular size. The phone currently runs Android version 4.2.2 Jelly Bean but iBerry claims that it will be updating the device to run Android version 4.4 KitKat by the end of the first quarter, this year. The upgrade, says iBerry, will arrive via an Over-the-Air (OTA) update. As far as the imaging bit for the iBerry Auxus Nuclea N2 goes, the smartphone will sport a 13-megapixel rear snapper. It will come along with a BSI sensor and auto-focus capabilities. The company has not revealed details about the front camera on the Nuclea N2 though. The connectivity part of the phone sees NFC, along with the usual suspects like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, EDGE, GPRS, GPS/AGPS and 3G. The whole show is powered by a 3,500mAh Li-on battery that promises a talk time of more than 12 hours. The phone will be priced at Rs 19,990 for only a limited period of 10 days, starting January 18, 2013. The offer can be redeemed from iBerry’s official website and authorised retailers across the country. The regular price of Rs 23,990 will come into effect post the 10 day period. The N2 will compete directly with the Gionee Elife E7 Mini and Intex Aqua Octa, both of which retail around the same price point.

    Source:Tech2

    — 3 months ago
    #Android  #iberry  #Jelly Bean  #ocat-core  #Smartphones